Rightpet

Lennon

Rat Terrier

Overall satisfaction

3/5

Acquired: Breeder (professional)

Gender: Male

Training: Puppy, Obedience

Quick to learn and train

3/5

Emotionally stable

2/5

Family oriented

1/5

Child safety

2/5

Safe with small pets

4/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

3/5

Health

4/5

Easy to groom

3/5

Great watch dog

4/5

Great guard dog

2/5

Rockin' Dog

By

Ceres, California, United States

Posted October 30, 2016

Lennon was the runt of the litter. He was born of two mild mannered show dogs with a colorful history of awards and rodent hunting abilities, and was introduced to our family when his eyes were still closed. The breeder was very selective about who was allowed to touch the puppies, and very wary of introducing them to children. This should have been an indicator that perhaps the dogs were not the most child-inclined creatures, as even the parents were kept apart from younger humans, but we purchased Lennon regardless and introduced him into our family.

As a puppy, Lennon was affectionate, curious, and attached to his human family. He enjoyed sleeping on top of people's chests or curling up in their warm arms. Issues arose quickly when it came to separation; he would wail and scream whenever he was not in the company of any of the family. This became a problem since everyone in the family was gone at some point in the day, be it at work or school. Due to this, he seemed to develop a high sense of independence and nonchalance towards the majority of people he met.

Around other dogs, cats, rabbits, and rats, Lennon remained surprisingly calm. It was relatively easy to train him to disregard hunting instincts towards smaller animals, although I would have never left him alone with anything other than cats or dogs. Due to his size, he was more inclined to bonding with cats. Larger dogs intimidated him, and he tended to avoid them unless they were older and demonstrated lethargic qualities.

For some reason, Lennon's favorite "toy" was not tennis balls or chew toys. He liked rocks. In particular, he was enamored with rocks about the size of a human hand which were round, and preferably of oceanic origin. He would roll these rocks around for hours in the back yard with his front two paws, and always attempted to bring them into the house and hide them under the couch. We eventually gave up on keeping him from them, and allowed him to have a few (clean) rocks inside so that he wouldn't cry after them at the back door.

As Lennon got older, he became more anti-social towards loud and young people and found comfort around the old and the quiet. His favorite pastime at present is sitting next to my mother while she watches television, or sleeping at the foot of her bed at night. He is a sweet dog, but does significantly better when there is only one person in the home.

Despite everything, though his muzzle is flecked with grey and his energy level has depleted, Lennon will still get up and pummel those special rocks that we bring him home from the ocean every now and again.

0 member found this helpful